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cannabis edibles side effects

The potency of edibles is difficult to measure. Regulations for the labeling and manufacturing of edibles are moderate at best. It is hard to determine the true amount of THC in an edible and dosage estimates are therefore imprecise. Thus, you may not know how much THC you are actually consuming.

Research shows that heart issues are more prevalent in eating edibles than with smoking marijuana. A recent study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine found that 8% of emergency room visitors who had consumed edibles had heart symptoms such as irregular heartbeats compared to just 3% of marijuana smokers who visited the ER. Consuming edibles was also more likely to lead to short-term psychiatric conditions such as anxiety when compared with smoking the drug.

Unknown Strength

If you find that you are using marijuana despite negative physical or psychological effects, it’s time to take a closer look at how this drug use fits into your life. It could be that you are using marijuana to alleviate boredom, stress, and other negative emotions, or to cope with problems in life. If this is the case, then counseling could be beneficial.

There are many health consequences associated with editing edibles. In fact, health issues can be even worse with edibles than with smoking marijuana. The following symptoms are possible side effects of marijuana edibles:

Call Rehab After Work to inquire about our group therapy for drug use. You will meet with a licensed counselor and a group of your peers to discuss how marijuana use is impacting you. You’ll also explore healthier ways to cope with stressors. Right now, we’re offering all of our programs online through teletherapy .

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Theophylline interacts with CANNABIS

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