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Marijuana also contains hundreds of other chemicals, the amounts varying from plant to plant.

The active ingredients in marijuana are chemicals known as cannabinoids.

THC is what makes people “high.”

How Does Marijuana Make You High? THC vs. CBD

Marijuana is a drug made from the buds and leaves of the cannabis plant. These parts of the plant are dried and then either smoked as cigarettes or consumed in other ways.

People consume marijuana in order to alter their state of consciousness or achieve a state of relaxation. This experience is called a high, and it can be achieved through many different means, including smoking, vaporizing, or eating food with marijuana cooked in as an ingredient.

While it does not lead to addiction in the way heroin or cocaine does, and many argue that its highs are no more intense or damaging than those given by alcohol, marijuana is considered illegal under United States federal law.

Marijuana’s capacity for relieving stress, relaxing the body, and changing your perception has made it a popular recreational drug for thousands of years.

Dosages of Marijuana Should Be Given As Follows:

Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), a component of marijuana, acts both centrally and peripherally on endogenous cannabinoid receptors. Activation of cannabinoid receptors affects serotonin release, increases catecholamines, inhibits parasympathetic activity and inhibits prostaglandin biosynthesis.

Marijuana can be used to decrease intraocular pressure, analgesia, anti-vomiting (antiemetic) effects and as an appetite stimulant.

What Are Dosages of Marijuana?

In October of 2009 the U.S. Justice Department announced that it will no longer enforce federal drug laws on persons who use marijuana for medicinal purposes or their sanctioned suppliers, as long as state laws are followed.

Marijuana is available under the following different brand names: Cannabis, Ganja, Hash, Hashish, Hemp, Mary Jane, Pot, Reefer, and Weed.

The United States (U.S.) Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) classifies marijuana as a Schedule 1 substance under the Controlled Substances Act (CSA). Schedule I drugs are recognized as having a high potential for abuse with insufficient evidence for safety and efficacy with no currently accepted medical use for treatment in the U.S.

Marijuana is not approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for medical use in the U.S. and remains classified as an illicit drug by the DEA. However, several states have adopted individual State Medical Marijuana Laws including: Alaska, California, Colorado, Hawaii, Maine, Maryland, Michigan, Montana, Nevada, New Mexico, Oregon, Rhode Island, Washington, and Vermont.