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Follow along with these step-by-step instructions to learn how to make homemade cannabis oil. We’ll also briefly discuss the science behind cannabis oil, and what types of cannabis to use to make oil. Finally, we’ll go over various ways to use homemade cannabis oil, including some notes about caution and dosing with edibles.

Yet when it comes to heating cannabis, it is best to do so low, slow, and methodically. There are time and temperature “sweet spots” where raw THCA and CBDA are converted into active THC and CBD. But without a precise process, over-heating or under-heating cannabis can lead to uneven activation of THC and CBD. Even worse, it may even destroy the THC or CBD altogether!

What is Cannabis-Infused Oil

Cannabis oil is made by lightly heating (and thus infusing) cannabis in a “carrier oil”. Cannabinoids like CBD and THC, the most active components in cannabis, are both hydrophobic. That means they don’t like water, and are actually repelled by water molecules. On the flip side, CBD and THC are both fat-soluble. They like to bind with fatty acid molecules – such as those found in oil. When cannabis is steeped in oil, the THC and CBD molecules leave the buds or plant material and become one with the oil instead.

A wide variety of oils can be used to make cannabis oil. However, coconut oil and olive oil are the most popular and common. Coconut oil and olive oil are both pleasant-tasting and very nourishing for skin, making them versatile options for either medicated edibles or topical applications. Plus, they both have strong natural antifungal and antimicrobial properties. This helps prevent mold and extends the shelf life of your cannabis oil. Coconut oil is higher in saturated fat, which may bind fat-loving cannabinoids even more readily than olive oil.

Your choice! You can make cannabis-infused oil with hemp or marijuana, depending on what is legal and available in your area. Or, what you’re desired end-results are. Hemp oil will only contain CBD (or a very minuscule amount of THC), while marijuana-infused oil will likely contain both THC and CBD. The ratio and concentration of THC and/or CBD depends on the strain of marijuana and particular plant it came from.

You can also use cannabis oil like you would an edible or a capsule by adding it to food and drinks. While this method is effective, the bioavailability of anything you ingest is generally lower, meaning you won’t absorb the cannabinoids as thoroughly because they must pass through the stomach and the liver. Ingesting cannabis oil can take anywhere from 30 to 90 minutes to kick in depending on things like what you’ve eaten and the speed of your metabolism.

You’ve heard a lot about cannabis oil lately – and for good reason. It’s a great method for consuming cannabis with a long list of benefits, and a good option if you are new to medical cannabis or don’t like the idea of inhalation. Figuring out how to use cannabis oil can seem a little complicated at first, but we are here to help. This article will go over the basics of how to use cannabis oil so you can learn how to make it work for you.

Start with a few drops and wait at least an hour to see how you feel. Slowly increase the dose until you experience the effects you desire. Keep in mind that more isn’t always better and there could be a tiny dosage window or “sweet spot” that works best for you. You might need to adjust your dosage over time, but many people find that a consistent dose can work for their needs over the long term.

How to Use Cannabis Oil

The most effective way to take cannabis oil is sublingually, where the oil is placed under the tongue with a dropper and absorbed by the mucous membranes that lead directly to the bloodstream. This method allows it to bypass the stomach, which raises the bioavailability (the number of cannabinoids that make it to your bloodstream when your body absorbs the medicine) and takes about 15 to 30 minutes to kick in.

Just like with any cannabis product, dosing depends on the individual. It will take a bit of experimentation to find the right dose for you, but the general rule of thumb is “start low and go slow.” You want to find the lowest dose that provides the effects you are looking for, and that might be lower than what is recommended on the product label.

While there are many methods of extracting oil from a cannabis plant, some are safer and more effective than others. CO2 extraction is quickly becoming the gold standard because it produces a safe and potent product that is free from chlorophyll, waxes, and any toxic residues that other solvents can sometimes leave behind.

Cannabis oils are concentrates that are created by extracting cannabinoids like THC and CBD from cannabis plants. Most oils you find at a dispensary are created by a process called “chemical extraction.” These methods use a solvent to extract cannabinoids along with other beneficial compounds like terpenes and flavonoids and add them to carriers like hemp oil or MCT oil.