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cbd oil consumption

When some people hear “CBD,” their minds immediately jump to marijuana. And while there is a connection, it’s not as close as one might think. Since recreational and medical cannabis is available in several states now, it’s important to note the differences. CBD is primarily a hemp derivative, which is like a cousin to marijuana, but not the same plant.

Typically, these effects aren’t dire, but they can be inconvenient and disruptive to a person’s everyday routine.

CBD uses

A recent study by Penn Medicine revealed that almost 70% of cannabidiol products sold online are mislabeled. So, products from online retailers that haven’t been properly vetted could contain higher levels of THC or other compounds. Our survey found that 22% of people won’t try CBD because they don’t trust the product or manufacturer.

But is CBD a wonder drug, or just another health fad? There’s no shortage of opinions out there, but we can discern a lot from CBD statistics. We’ve compiled reliable research and conducted a CBD survey to put the prevalence of CBD use and its potential health benefits into perspective.

Let’s take a step back. Both hemp and marijuana fall into the cannabis genus. Cannabis plants contain two naturally-occurring compounds: cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). CBD and THC are both cannabinoids but have different effects on the body. Most prominently, THC has psychoactive effects and CBD doesn’t, which is why CBD doesn’t make you feel high.

It’s not just your body that influences how long it takes CBD to work, but also the quality of the CBD product and how often it’s used. Once you acquire CBD oil, the next step is to find the optimal dosing regimen, including frequency of use. The answers will depend largely on the type of product, amount of CBD inside it, and the specific ailment you are targeting. Most reputable manufacturers will provide instructions on how to properly use the product, but experimentation may be required to find the optimal dose for you and your specific needs.

In recent years, cannabidiol (CBD) oil has skyrocketed in popularity. Knowledge about how it works in the human body, however, has accelerated at a snail’s pace. If you’ve ever wondered, “How long does it take for CBD oil to work?” or “How long will the effects of CBD oil last?” you’re not alone.

Inhalation is often seen as an effective method of delivery for CBD because of how quickly it’s absorbed in the body. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

How long does it take CBD to get out of your system?

Body fat influences the amount of CBD you need to feel an effect. The larger the body mass, the more CBD required to feel potential effects. Bodyweight and mass also affect how long CBD will remain in your system. Like THC, CBD is stored in fat cells and gradually eliminated from the body through urine and feces.

A 2018 review of existing CBD studies found that the estimated half-life of CBD was two to five days for those who took a daily oral dose. Other delivery methods delivered varied half-lives. Since you may feel the effects of CBD immediately after inhalation, this method is appealing for those seeking immediate, potential pain relief. The same study found that the half-life of smoked CBD was 31 hours.

When ingesting CBD edibles, the same principle applies. Let’s say, for example, you’re taking CBD gummies or adding a few drops of CBD oil into your favorite recipe. It will ultimately go through the same lengthy process and reduce the total CBD concentration in your bloodstream. With ingestion, it could be one to two hours before the effects of CBD finally set in.

When you apply topical CBD products directly to your skin, the CBD is absorbed and slowly interacts with localized cannabinoid receptors. In some cases, CBD-infused topicals should be applied liberally to overcome the low cannabinoid absorption rate of the skin. With topical application, any CBD effects you feel will peak after about 90 minutes. This method of administration is often used for chronic pain in specific areas.