CBD Oil Dosage For Sleep

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Best CBD for sleep. Best CBD dosage for sleep. Improve sleep; sleep quality to get the rest your body needs. Thinking about trying CBD or other cannabis compound to help you sleep? Here’s what you need to know. CBD (cannabidiol) is commonly used to treat sleep symptoms like insomnia. Learn more about cannabinoids, how CBD works, its forms & effects on the body.

CBD Dosage for Sleep

Getting a good night’s sleep can make a huge difference in life, from energy levels to mood and even immunity. In our stressed out, frenetic world, poor sleep is an epidemic.

Fortunately, CBD oil can be a huge help in improving sleep quality. The question is: What’s the right CBD dose? Unlike other sleep aids, CBD dosage is not one size fits all.

CBD, short for cannabidiol, is a cannabinoid, a plant chemical derived from hemp or cannabis. CBD is a gentle, safe, and effective way to manage sleep disturbances. Whether your sleep disorder is due to stress, chronic pain, or some other sleep issue, CBD can help.

CBD comes in many forms, such as tinctures or capsules. Or you might prefer taking a CBD gummy before bedtime. The form of CBD and the dosage can impact its effectiveness, and it all differs from person to person. Read on to learn more about the science behind CBD dosage.

How much CBD should you take for sleep?

So how much CBD should you take for sleep? In the following sections, we will explore CBD dosage for different sleep issues, such as insomnia or sleep apnea. First, let’s briefly explore the differences between CBD product categories. CBD comes in different forms, including:

  • CBD oil/tincture
  • CBD gummy
  • CBD capsule
  • CBD vape
  • Topical CBD balms or cream

Certain types of CBD may work a little faster than others. A CBD oil or tincture isn’t digested the way a CBD gummy or capsule is. Topical CBD works on the muscles and joints it’s applied to–like hands, wrists, legs and your back. CBD topicals are helpful for sleep only in cases where a chronic, specific pain is causing sleep problems.

While the overall CBD dose is usually the same for different types of CBD, you might find one form works better for you, with perhaps a slight adjustment in dosage.

You should also understand the difference between broad spectrum CBD, full spectrum CBD and pure CBD. Pure CBD contains the CBD (cannabidiol) isolate only, while broad and full spectrum CBD contains additional cannabinoid phytochemicals such as terpenes that add additional benefit to your CBD sleep aid.

With all that in mind, your individual CBD dose depends in part on your body weight. However, body weight is not the only factor in CBD dosage. Each individual has a unique “endocannabinoid” system that reacts uniquely to CBD levels. Thus, use your body weight only as a starting point.

A CBD dosage calculator makes this easy, and many are available for free online. Some calculators will also translate milligrams into milliliters or even “drops,” so you can apply the calculation to your CBD tincture.

How long does it take for CBD to kick in for sleep?

If you aren’t getting enough sleep , you may be feeling desperate for a fast-acting solution. CBD won’t cure your insomnia overnight, but it can help reset your sleep patterns to allow you get the sleep your mind and body need. However, you need to be patient. In research done to determine CBD’s effectiveness for insomnia, most subjects saw a positive difference in their sleep after a few weeks or a month.

Fortunately, the overall results from research seem promising. In one study , almost 80 percent of patients experienced relief from anxiety and over 66 percent experienced improved sleep after taking 25 mg of CBD in a capsule daily.

The important distinction to make between CBD and your average sleeping pill is that CBD does not work like a sedative. CBD won’t “knock you out” instantly like prescription hypnotics. Instead, CBD works to help regulate stress hormones such as cortisol, as well as reduce pain and anxiety, both of which negatively impact sleep. In short, CBD works more to alleviate the causes of insomnia than simply create a state of artificial unconsciousness like a sleeping pill.

Therefore, while CBD can create a mild relaxing effect before bedtime, you don’t need to take it before bed for it to be effective for sleep. Additionally, it won’t make you “instantly” fall asleep like a traditional sedative.

How much CBD oil can you take before bed?

CBD oil can be very helpful for improving sleep. As a liquid, it can be easily assimilated. So how much can you take before bed? The safe upper limit of CBD for humans according to research is approximately 1,500 mg, which is quite high. In all likelihood you won’t need that much, and the averaged recommended CBD dosage is anywhere from 20 to 40 mg.

You can take CBD oil right before bed or during the day for sleep problems. The main reason to take CBD oil before bed is for anxiety relief. Either way, take the same dosage you would take during the daytime. Remember, sometimes less is more with CBD. If going above a certain dosage of CBD makes you feel too “amped,” you should dial the dose back.

What can you expect when taking CBD gummies for sleep?

CBD gummies are another great way to help improve sleep. While they may be a bit slower for the body to digest than a liquid such as a tincture, they are popular for a number of reasons. Many people just like the taste and texture of gummies and prefer them to CBD tinctures for this reason. They are also convenient and can be less messy.

CBD gummies do need to be digested, unlike tinctures, so if taking them right before bed gets your stomach churning, you might switch to a liquid delivery system. Try taking gummies an hour or two before bed instead of right before you turn off the lights. Otherwise, if your stomach is fine, CBD gummies are a great way to help you calm down and prepare for sleep. (Our scientifically formulated CALM gum drops also include terpenes to provide a powerful sleep aid.)

Wisdom Essentials CALM Gum Drops

How do you determine CBD dosage for insomnia?

CBD has been shown to help insomniacs in many research studies. CBD for insomnia is a natural alternative to harsh, possibly addictive sleeping pills, some of which have dangerous and scary side effects.

What types of CBD are best for insomnia?

In general, CBD topicals such as pain creams are not ideal for sleep disturbances such as insomnia, unless the entire problem is due to pain in a specific area. CBD topicals don’t work systemically, so they only work as localized pain killers.

If you want to improve your REM sleep and get on a better sleep cycle, CBD edibles are preferred. CBD oil, especially in a tincture, can be a great CBD product to alleviate insomnia. You might also try a CBD gummy. Look for broad-spectrum CBD that contains additional cannabinoids and terpenes for the most powerful effect.

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What are the best CBD dosages for insomnia?

The CBD dosage for insomnia is pretty much the same dosage you would use for any other type of sleep disorder. If the insomnia is severe, you might be tempted to take a lot more CBD right off the bat, but the maximum CBD dosage may not be necessary to quell your sleepless nights.

In fact, too much CBD isolate can sometimes create the opposite effect in some people. In other words, up to a certain dosage level, the CBD will be calming and relaxing. But once a certain threshold is hit (which is usually fairly high, so don’t worry), the CBD ends up making some people more anxious and wound up.

Our suggestion is to start with one dropper of DREAM and adjust from there based on your results.

How do you take CBD for insomnia if you’re taking other medications?

CBD can interact with certain medications, so please talk to your doctor first before starting a CBD regimen. If you want to replace your sleep medication with CBD, you should also consult with your doctor first.

What is the CBD dosage for sleep apnea?

Sleep apnea is sometimes a life-threatening sleep disorder that involves a temporary breathing stoppage in the middle of the night. While there are three types of sleep apnea , the most common and well known is obstructive sleep apnea.

Obstructive sleep apnea is when the airway partially or fully closes, stopping the free flow of air to the lungs. It can occur due to genetic structural differences in the oral, throat, and nasal cavities as well as conditions such as obesity and even alcoholism. This can obviously impact sleep negatively by interrupting REM sleep, disrupting the sleep cycle, and reducing sleep quality.

What does the evidence suggest about the effects of CBD on sleep apnea?

The research on CBD for apnea is quite promising and shows that CBD can help with sleep problems due to sleep apnea, such as insomnia.

How does CBD treat sleep apnea symptoms?

CBD cannot cure the cause of sleep apnea if it is due to a structural issue in the throat. However, it can help relax the sufferer, which will make it easier to initially fall asleep and fall back asleep if an apnea episode occurs. Unlike cannabis, CBD won’t make you high, which can cause anxiety in some people and why medical marijuana might not be an option for certain sleep apnea patients.

What are the best CBD dosages for sleep apnea?

As with insomnia and general sleep disturbances, CBD dosage for sleep apnea is individual. You do not need to take extra CBD as a sleep aid for apnea; just the regular dose you would take otherwise will do. Remember, take an internal CBD edible, oil, or tincture instead of an external CBD cream.

What is the best CBD dosage to improve sleep quality?

Even if you don’t have a serious sleep problem such as sleep apnea, you might still benefit from a CBD product as a sleep aid. Recent research suggests as much as 60 percent or more of Americans don’t feel adequately rested upon waking, and this dramatically impacts productivity.

Sleep quality is an important factor in how well rested we are each morning. Quality is all about the depth of your sleep and how restful it was. Sleep quality is just as, if not more, important than sleep quantity. If you are “sleeping” for twelve hours, but much of it involves tossing and turning as opposed to actually sleeping, that’s not good sleep.

One of the main culprits is stress. Chronic stress can disrupt REM sleep and destabilize the entire sleep cycle. Each night, we need to have a balance of REM sleep and deep sleep in order to wake up feeling energized and ready to start the day. REM sleep (REM stands for “rapid eye movement”) helps us to process the events of the day. Poor sleep interrupts that critical process.

How do you find out what dosage of CBD you need for the best sleep?

CBD dosage is as much of an art as a science. As a consistent CBD user, you will probably figure out over time which type of CBD you prefer, whether it’s CBD oil or a CBD gummy, as well as what dose works best. We recommend keeping a sleep log that tracks your sleep quality along with your CBD dosage to find that happy sweet spot for your particular needs.

How do you improve the results of using CBD for sleep quality?

While the CBD isolate in and of itself can generate better sleep, you can often get even better results when using CBD and melatonin . The two combined work synergistically to help reset the sleep cycle and reduce pain and anxiety that might negatively impact sleep.

Should you increase your CBD dosage for sleep if you think it’s not working?

You should start your CBD dosage off at the lowest level and see how you feel for a few weeks. Then, slowly increase the dosage. Back off and reduce the dosage if you start getting any side effects such as upset stomach, nausea, dizziness, irritability, or more anxiety.

Can high-quality CBD help improve sleep?

Finally, we believe that CBD dosage won’t matter if the CBD isn’t of the best quality. Fortunately, our team at Wisdom Essentials has put together the highest-quality CBD products for sleep based on botanical science. Our physician-formulated Wisdom Essentials DREAM tincture leverages the power of CBD along with melatonin and natural sleep-promoting terpenes.

Check out our online store for high-quality CBD products with melatonin to promote optimal sleep.

Cannabis, CBD, and Sleep

If you’re one of the millions of people who have trouble sleeping, you may have considered a cannabis compound, such as CBD. Some say cannabis compounds are helpful, but more research is needed. And they might not be legal, depending on where you live. Look up the laws to know what’s allowed.

What Does the Research Say About Cannabis?

Also known as marijuana, there’s growing interest in the health benefits of cannabis, specifically cannabis compounds. Two cannabinoids that get a lot of attention are:

  • Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). The compound in cannabis that makes you feel high. Human-made versions are used to ease nausea and vomiting from cancer treatment.
  • Cannabidiol (CBD). A compound in cannabis said to have anti-inflammatory and anti-seizure properties. It does not make you feel high.

Research results on cannabis and sleep are mixed. So far, there haven’t been many controlled studies to show that THC, CBD, or a combination of both can boost sleep quality, says Bhanuprakash (Bhanu) Kolla, MD. He’s an associate professor of psychiatry and psychology and a consultant for Mayo Clinic’s Center for Sleep Medicine in Rochester, MN.

But some studies show promise. That includes a small one on dronabinol, a human-made version of medical THC. Early research shows it might help with obstructive sleep apnea. But “at this point, we do not recommend the use of cannabis products for treatment of sleep apnea or other sleep disorders,” Kolla says.

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Ryan Vandrey, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimoe, looks at how cannabis use affects sleep. He says there’s evidence that THC can help you fall asleep faster in the short-term. But “there’s a big gap in our knowledge” for how cannabis affects overall sleep quality long-term or if it can help people with sleep disorders.

Possible Benefits

Michelle Sexton, ND (naturopathic doctor), assistant adjunct professor in the department of anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego, helps people use cannabis to manage certain health conditions. She says those who use THC to ease pain often report longer sleep time. “They’re not waking as much,” she says.

Sexton sees some real-world benefits from THC products. But when it comes to cannabis research on sleep, “the body of literature is pretty small.”

There’s some evidence that nabilone — another human-made form of cannabis — might help ease sleep problems related to posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Vandrey says people with PTSD often say they have fewer nightmares when they use cannabis. “A lot of folks report not remembering dreams,” he says.

A lot more research is needed to know if CBD can help with sleep. Vandrey says people who use it to manage other health conditions — anxiety, pain, epilepsy — often say their sleep gets better. But he says we don’t know if that’s from the CBD itself or because the compound helps in other ways.

“We can try to piece together a story,” Vandrey says. “But it’s really an incomplete picture at this point.”

Risks of Using Cannabis

Your brain and body get used to the chemicals in cannabis or other drugs. You’ll have to use a higher dose to get the same effects. With repeated use, cannabis might not help you sleep as well, or you might find it hard to snooze on your own.

“What commonly happens is people get into a pattern of using cannabis — whether it’s a high THC or high CBD hemp product — on a daily basis for an extended period of time,” Vandrey says. “Then, when they go one night without it, they can’t sleep.”

You’re not likely to overdose on THC or CBD, but here are some things to think about:

  • Withdrawal. Long-term cannabis use can cause sleep problems when you try to quit. Vandrey says that includes insomnia and the return of vivid dreams or nightmares.
  • Dizziness or balance problems. If you have to get up to pee at night, Sexton says to give yourself a minute to see if you feel stable. If you have a walking aid, make sure you use it.
  • Trouble thinking clearly. Heavy cannabis use is linked to problems with memory, learning, and attention.
  • Health problems. Smoking any substance can hurt your lungs, heart, or blood vessels.
  • Substance misuse. Cannabis is less addictive than alcohol or opioids. But people who use it every day might get a cannabis use disorder. Tell your doctor if you want to stop but can’t. They’ll help you quit.

Don’t use cannabis products if you’re pregnant or breastfeeding. The drug could affect your baby.

Is CBD Safe?

Kolla says it’s OK to use CBD if you think it helps your sleep. He says there isn’t any data to show that it’s harmful. But keep in mind these products aren’t regulated by the FDA. There’s no way to know exactly what you’re getting. “A lot of times, CBD can be contaminated with THC and there are potentials for drug interactions,” Kolla says.

Vandrey says CBD can interact with multiple biological systems in the body. But he says there’s no research to know how long-term use will affect those systems. Until we know more, “keep use of these products controlled in some way,” he says. “You use them for a couple of weeks and then you stop.”

How to Use Cannabis

There isn’t an official “dose” that works for everyone. Always read the product label for instructions. Even better, talk to a health care professional before you try THC or CBD. Tell them if you have other health problems or you take any other medication.

Sexton doesn’t suggest CBD as a sleep aid. She says it can have an “alerting” effect for some people. Here are some of her tips for how and when to use THC:

Look for “indica” on the label. There isn’t one “nighttime” strain. You’ll need to try different kinds to see what works best for you. Though, she says something labeled indica might be more sedating.

Start with a low dose. Sexton says a 2-milligram dose is a good place to start. If you’re new to THC, you might want to go lower. More might give you unwanted side effects. “You might wake up in the middle of the night paranoid with your mind racing,” Sexton says.

Use oral THC. Drop it in the back of your mouth and swallow. “I typically stick with the oral dose because of how long it lasts, and it comes on more slowly,” she says.

The effects kick in after 1 to 3 hours, she says, and could last for 6 to 8 hours. If you try a dose that doesn’t help, “wait it out.” Sexton says you can raise your dose by 50% the next night.

  • If you have trouble staying asleep. Take an oral dose right as your “head hits the pillow.”
  • If you have trouble falling asleep. Take an oral dose 1 to 2 hours before bed.

Don’t go above 10 milligrams. A larger amount might raise your odds of poor sleep. “We don’t know if (THC) is disrupting sleep architecture at those higher doses,” Sexton says.

Talk to a Doctor

Ask about nondrug ways to get a good night’s rest. “My sleep expert colleagues will always say behavioral treatments are superior to pharmacological treatments,” Vandrey says.

Sexton urges good sleep hygiene. But she also tries to find any hidden problems. Here are some questions she asks:

  • Do you exercise at 8 p.m.?
  • Do you drink green tea with dinner?
  • Do you take your B vitamins at night?
  • Are you stressed or anxious?
  • Is your sleep trouble linked to hormonal changes?

No detail is too small and could help your doctor figure out what’s triggering your sleep issues.

Show Sources

SOURCES:

Bhanuprakash (Bhanu) Kolla, MD, associate professor of psychiatry and psychology; consultant, Center for Sleep Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN.

Ryan Vandrey, PhD, professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore.

Michelle Sexton, ND, assistant adjunct professor in the department of anesthesiology at the University of California, San Diego.

Frontiers in Molecular Neuroscience: “Cannabinoids, Endocannabinoids, and Sleep.”

CDC: “Marijuana and Public Health.”

Antioxidants: “Antioxidative and Anti-Inflammatory Properties of Cannabidiol.”

Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine: “Medical Cannabis and the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea: An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Position Statement.”

Current Psychiatry Reports: “Cannabis, Cannabinoids, and Sleep: a Review of the Literature.”

Cannabis: “Cannabis use is associated with greater total sleep time in middle-aged and older adults with and without HIV: A preliminary report utilizing digital health technologies.”

Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology: “Use of a Synthetic Cannabinoid in a Correctional Population for Posttrautmatic Stress Disorder-Related Insomnia and Nightmares, Chronic Pain, Harm Reduction, and Other Indications.”

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Addiction: “Heavy cannabis use, dependence and the brain: a clinical perspective.”

CBD Oil Dosage For Sleep

In recent years, the use of marijuana and CBD for the treatment of a variety of conditions has risen significantly. Specifically, CBD has been found to have potential health benefits for symptoms like insomnia. Here’s a little background on what CBD is and how it impacts your sleep and body.

What Are Cannabinoids and CBD?

Cannabinoids are chemical compounds that bind or attach to certain receptors in the central nervous system and act as chemical messengers. Depending on the specific cannabinoid, it may have varied effects on the body.

The most well-known and probably most researched cannabinoids include cannabidiol (CBD) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). We know that THC is the cannabinoid that leads to the “buzz or high” from cannabis use.

CBD differs from THC and does not cause psychoactive effects or a “high.” Because it does not cause the psychoactive effects and it might help certain conditions, such as pain, anxiety, and insomnia, CBD is gaining traction as a possible treatment for several diseases.

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How Do CBD and Cannabinoids Work?

Not everything is completely understood about how cannabinoids (including CBD) work. What we do know from research is that CBD and cannabinoids interact with proteins and cells in the brain. A relatively newly discovered system may also hold some answers.

The Endocannabinoid System and Sleep

Researchers discovered that the endocannabinoid system plays a role in maintaining certain body functions, such as mood, appetite, sleep, and regulating circadian rhythms. Within the endocannabinoid system is a network of cannabinoid receptors in the brain and central nervous system.The two primary receptors identified are CB1 and CB2.

Cannabinoids attach to these cells and have various effects. As far as how they may affect sleep, some research indicates that the cannabinoid CBD may interact with specific receptors, potentially affecting the sleep/wake cycle.

Additionally, CBD may also decrease anxiety and pain, which can both interfere with restful sleep. By reducing certain symptoms, it’s also possible that sleep may improve.

What Does the Research Say About CBD?

Although more studies need to be performed, some research supports the theory that CBD and cannabinoids may improve sleep. This study published in the journal, Medicines, involved 409 people with insomnia. Data was collected from June 2016 to May 2018. Participants rated their symptoms of insomnia on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most severe. Starting symptoms were rated 6.6 on average.

The participants were treated using the cannabis flower with varied combustion methods including vape, pipe, and joint. THC potency on average was 20 percent and limited to 30 percent. CBD potency was on average 5.7 percent and limited to 30 percent. After using cannabis, participants rated symptoms on average to be 2.2, which was a decrease of 4.5.

The results indicated the cannabinoids in cannabis decreased symptoms of insomnia. But the study involved using the cannabis flower, which contains several cannabinoids. It’s difficult to determine if relief from insomnia was due to CBD or another cannabinoid.

In another study published in the Permanente Journal, 72 adults with anxiety and poor sleep were involved. The participants completed anxiety and sleep assessments at the start of the study and at the first-month follow up. Study participants were given 25 mg of CBD in capsule form. Those that predominantly had sleep complaints took the dose in the evening. Participants that had anxiety as their predominant complaint took CBD in the morning.

After the first month, anxiety scores decreased in 79 percent of the people. Sleep scores improved in 66 percent of the participants, which indicated less trouble sleeping. The results suggest that CBD decreased sleep difficulties in many of the participants. But while the decrease in anxiety symptoms remained steady for the duration of the study, the sleep scores fluctuated over time.

Several smaller studies have also supported the use of CBD oil to improve sleep. For example, a case study involving a 10-year-old girl with post-traumatic stress disorder and poor sleep was treated with CBD. A trial of 25 mg of a CBD supplement was administered at bedtime. An additional 6 to 12 mg of CBD was given via a sublingual spray during the day for anxiety. Sleep quantity and quality gradually improved over five months.

Though there is plenty of supporting evidence that shows CBD and cannabinoids can improve sleep, the results are not conclusive and more research needs to be done.

Forms of CBD

CBD is extracted from the cannabis plant and known as CBD oil. But it can be a little complicated. CBD may be extracted from either the marijuana or hemp plant, which are both strains of the Cannabis sativa plant. But they are harvested differently. Hemp comes from the seeds and stalks of the plant, which contains less THC than marijuana.

Because the THC content in CBD oil may vary, depending on the state it’s sold, there may be restrictions. For example, in some states, CBD oil is sold legally if all of the THC is removed. If CBD oil still contains THC or other cannabinoids, it may only be sold in states that have legalized marijuana use.

Depending on the laws in your state, you may need a doctor’s prescription for CBD oil. But laws continue to change quickly, so in the near future, it may be different.

CBD oil can be placed under the tongue. It may also be infused in different products including the following;

  • Edibles: Various types of edibles infused with CBD oil are available including gummy bears, cakes, and cookies. Edibles usually list the concentration of CBD in milligrams.
  • Vaporing: CBD extract can be used in a vaporizer or vape pen. As the extract heats up, it creates a vapor that is inhaled.
  • Tinctures: CBD also comes in tinctures. A few drops of the liquid can be added to drinks.

CBD oil is available in different concentrations. Since research is ongoing, the exact dose to treat sleep issues may not be fully known. It might take some trial and error to determine what works best.

Because there are so many different ways to ingest CBD, there are tons of CBD products to choose from. If you aren’t sure where to start, here are the CBD products we recommend to try if you want to improve your sleep.

Overall, there is scientific research that supports the theory that there are CBD health benefits. While more research needs to be done, the use of CBD can potentially decrease your symptoms of insomnia and help you get more quality sleep. If you struggle with sleep issues, the best first step is to consult your doctor and learn more about causes and treatments.

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