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cbd oil for ms pain

Most CBD stuff sold online and in local dispensaries comes from hemp plants, which takes us to the next question.

Such is the case of using CBD oil for multiple sclerosis (MS).

Progressive-Relapsing (PRMS)

CBD is a cannabinoid — a naturally occurring phytochemical — and the second-most recognized active ingredient of cannabis.

Currently, about 2.3 million people in the US suffer from MS. The majority of diagnosed patients are between their 20s and 50s — it’s unclear why some people have this condition while others don’t.

However, Thrower points to CBD topicals as a potential solution for fighting localized pain in MS patients

Instead, they’ll likely just continue to push the risky, absurdly expensive pharmaceutical drugs which are backed by FDA research, federal regulations, and of course, multibillion dollar pharmaceutical corporations.

Will the U.S. Government’s patent limit the likelihood that CBD gets approved as a multiple sclerosis treatment? Only time will tell…

As it turns out, not all CBD oils are exactly the same. While they all, of course, rely on cannabidiol as the active component, some specific tinctures have shown to be more effective at treating symptoms stemming from MS than have others.

The continuing power of Big Pharma

While a full-spectrum cannabis CBD oil is thought to be the best option, these oils are often not available nationwide, as you typically need a medical marijuana license (MMJ card) and access to a legal dispensary to be able to purchase them.

Much research will be needed in order to understand any potential dynamic between MS and endocannabinoid deficiency.

Interferons work by lowering the number of white blood cells in the body. This limits the “sources” of attack on CNS nerve fibers. Since white blood cells make up the immune system and protect against disease, however, these drugs can be dangerous. They can even produce side effects similar to those of chemotherapy.

In fact, anecdotal evidence is already galvanizing thousands of MS sufferers to give CBD a try. Many are hoping to ditch their prescription meds in favor of the all-natural, non-psychoactive cannabinoid.

In November 2018, the Government legalised cannabis for medicinal use, but also put a strict criteria in place for who could access it. Only specialist doctors are allowed to prescribe medicinal cannabis, and so far only a handful of people have benefited from the change in law.

Cannabis is made up of compounds called cannabinoids. The main ones studied for their therapeutic effect are tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), which gets you ‘high’, and cannabidiol (CBD), which doesn’t.

There’s a medically approved cannabis-based treatment called Sativex, but it doesn’t work for everyone. In England and Wales you can get it on the NHS for ‘moderate’ to ‘severe’ spasticity (muscle spasms and stiffness). But you can have it only if other treatments haven’t worked. It’s not yet available in Scotland or Northern Ireland but we hope it soon will be.

One in five people with MS we surveyed in 2014 told us they’d used cannabis to help with their symptoms. They said it can help with muscle spasms or stiffness (spasticity) and pain.

Some people with MS use cannabis in a variety of ways to help ease their symptoms.