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cbd oil legal in military

As for the number of aches and ailments the oil is said to decrease, there is little scientific evidence to support it, according to the popular health information website webmd.com. However, research into hemp-derived medication continues to increase following the FDA’s approval of the CBD drug Epidiolex for the treatment of two rare forms of epilepsy, Dravet Syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut Syndrome.

Her remark is in reference to products containing cannabidiol extract, or CBD, which have exploded in popularity as a result of aggressive civilian advertising that touts their benefits as pain relievers, stress reducers, depression inhibitors and more.

According to CBD-product manufacturers, the key hemp-plant-based ingredient is “non-psychoactive,” which means the consumer won’t experience the “high” of typical THC found in cannabis. The disparity in that claim, from the DOD’s perspective, is found in the federal guidelines that say a product is federally legal if it contains less than 0.3 percent Tetrahydrocannabinol, meaning the THC is still present.

“CBD is everywhere,” a recently released Army News article pointed out. “You would be hard-pressed to enter any pharmacy, mega-mart or health food store and not find it on the shelves. CBD can even be purchased online from the comfort of your couch.”

Furthermore, with no Federal Drug Administration oversight of the production of CBD products, “there is an increased risk of potential injury related to ingesting potential molds, pesticides and heavy metals,” the Army News article advised.

An excerpt from Army Regulation 600-85, dated July 23, 2020, reads as follows: “The use of products made or derived from hemp (as defined in 7 USC. 1639o) … regardless of the product’s THC concentration, claimed or actual, and regardless of whether such product may lawfully be bought, sold and used under the law applicable to civilians, is prohibited.”

The other uniformed services have similar regulations prohibiting CBD’s use. There are federal workforce restrictions that apply to government civilians as well – further details are available on the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration website, samhsa.gov.

If the NDAA is signed into law with Gabbard’s amendment included, it would supersede the DoD’s rules. The provision that would allow reenlistment despite prior cannabis use is also attached to the House version of the NDAA. It is unknown at this time whether these marijuana policies will find approval in the Senate.

A longstanding zero-tolerance marijuana policy could be slowly eroding in the military. Earlier this month, a House committee approved a provision that would let troops who previously used cannabis to re-enlist. This week, Congress passed an amendment to allow service members the use of hemp and CBD products.

The federal government legalized hemp in 2018 and removed hemp from its list of controlled substances. Law qualifies any cannabis products with less than 0.3% THC as hemp, which created the booming CBD market we see today. This has caused confusion for law enforcement in some states where marijuana remains illegal, as cops must conduct laboratory analysis in cannabis-related cases.

The amendment, sponsored by Rep. Tulsi Gabbard, was added to the National Defense Authorization Act (NDAA) and included several non-cannabis amendments. The House of Representatives approved the NDAA in a 336 to 71 vote Monday.

Donovan sought to avoid that confusion and “spare the U.S. military the risks and adverse effects marijuana use has on the mission readiness of individual service members and military units.”.

A memo that was recently made public revealed the Pentagon had quietly moved to make CBD use a punishable offense for military troops. The Department of Defense banned hemp and CBD products in all forms in February to ”protect the integrity of the drug testing program,” wrote Matthew Donovan, Acting Undersecretary for the Department of Defense. Previously, the Navy and Marine Corps. were permitted use of topical products, including shampoos and lotions.

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Urinalysis testing is particularly controversial. Observed tests—meaning that someone is watching while the sample is produced—can re-traumatize sexual assault survivors or prove impossible for people suffering from paruresis (the inability to urinate in the presence of others). Urine tests are also fairly easy to cheat, and are often unreliable. They also cannot indicate whether or not someone has a substance use disorder, nor can they measure work performance. Nonetheless, drug test results are often misused to gauge both.

While research is still relatively sparse, there are a growing number of studies backing many of these claims. Littrel specifically mentioned research out of Israel that linked CBD with faster recovery from traumatic brain injuries in mice.

For the Department of Defense, however, the issue seems to be less about CBD’s potential efficacy or inefficacy, and more about whether or not a member’s use of a CBD product could interfere with the department’s ability to gauge and monitor drug use.

Curci now has a healthy relationship with marijuana, noting that since leaving the National Guard, he has experienced “positive effects of CBD for psychiatric issues and anxiety issues.”

When it comes to testing positive for THC due to a CBD product, toxicologists agree that it is unlikely, but not impossible.

Marino also noted that, to his knowledge, CBD was not able to be absorbed through the skin, making it especially perplexing that topical products are included in the ban.

“First of all, I don’t know why the military is drug testing people all the time; drug tests are terrible tests to begin with.”