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cbd oil pass drug test

The most common reason for a failed CBD drug test is that a person is using a CBD oil product that contains THC. Sometimes, this may be because a person purchases a low-quality product that does contain a small amount of THC—most manufacturers will claim their products do not contain THC, but this is not always the case.

There are several techniques for extracting CBD oil from the cannabis plant. The extraction method determines whether the active CBD compound gets processed as a “full spectrum oil” or an “isolate.” A CBD isolate is a pure compound with no other active compounds or cannabinoids at all. A full spectrum oil contains other active plant compounds in addition to the CBD such as CBN (cannabinol) and cannabis terpenes (the part of the plant that gives the plant its aroma), and more.

The primary difference between hemp and marijuana is that hemp is nearly void of THC. In fact, a cannabis strain must contain less than .3 percent THC to be classified as hemp. This is the reason hemp can be legally sold as various products.

3. Mislabeling of Products

However, the distinction between full spectrum oils and isolates make all the difference if you are being tested for drug use.

A more likely secondhand exposure scenario is a positive marijuana hair test, resulting from direct contact with marijuana paraphernalia or from another person having THC on their hands.

CBD oil extracted from hemp is not supposed to have any more than .3 percent of THC. However, it’s not uncommon for sellers to mislabel their products as THC-free hemp when in reality, it’s a low-quality oil extracted from marijuana, which does contain THC.

As it turns out, depending on the source of the cannabis that is used to produce the CBD oil, some products do contain traces of THC (including low-quality isolates and many full-spectrum tinctures).

CBD is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid found in cannabis. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps

There is mounting evidence that hair follicle drug testing methods are not able to accurately detect marijuana. Research published in the journal Scientific Reports suggests that the presence of THC and THC metabolites can be transferred to the hair follicles of non-consumers through contact with hands, sweat, or exhaled smoke.

Ingestibles

Although hemp-derived CBD products are available in states where recreational cannabis isn’t legal, some people might worry whether CBD will show up on a drug test. It’s a valid concern considering that even CBD products derived from hemp are legally permitted to contain traces of THC, 0.3% or less to be exact. And even in states where it is legal to buy THC-heavy cannabis from a retail store, some employers still screen employees for cannabis use. This may leave some consumers wondering whether there’s a small amount of THC in their CBD — and whether that will show up on a drug test.

If drug testing is a concern but you still want to consume CBD for any of its reported health benefits, you absolutely can. Follow the instructions below based on your preferred consumption method and choose CBD products accordingly.

Recognized as the preferred method for cannabis drug testing, urine screenings are often used as a benchmark to detect for cannabis use. Most urine tests utilize a specific sensitivity for the cutoff concentration of THC-COOH. The most common cutoff concentration point is 50 nanograms per milliliter (ng/mL), as suggested by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA).