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cbd oil skin rash

Skin conditions ranging from acne to dry and aging skin can be helped by CBD oil products. The best CBD option for your needs depends on your particular skin condition.

Therefore, CBD oil is useful in treating the root causes of skin conditions, and not just the accompanying inflammation.

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CBD oil is becoming popular as a preventative measure against skin conditions. It stops flare-ups from happening due to the endocannabinoid system’s role in regulating functions affecting the skin. Its anti-inflammatory properties help prevent conditions caused by inflammation.

All of these conditions have one thing in common: they are exacerbated by inflammation. Inflammation is a crucial natural process used by the body to protect against pathogens and irritants. However, with certain conditions, the inflammatory process only makes things worse, as is the case with skin conditions.

The skin is the body’s largest organ, as well as its first line of defense against illnesses and infections. For this reason, it is exposed to danger more than any other part of the body, and skin conditions are therefore quite prevalent. No one is immune to the occasional rash. Others face lifelong autoimmune disorders, including eczema, psoriasis, and dermatitis. Skin conditions are exacerbated by inflammation. And, since CBD oil is known to be a potent anti-inflammatory agent, more and more people are using CBD oil for skin conditions, both for treatment and prevention.

Eczema is not contagious, but doctors are not 100 percent sure of its cause. “We don’t really know its exact cause, but it is specific to genetic disposition, immune system and a potential range of environmental triggers that can cause an inflammation response which, in ‘overdrive,’ creates the physical symptoms of these conditions,” says Shamban.

Atopic eczema is a chronic disease where the skin barrier has become leaky, and inflammation occurs.

Can CBD cure eczema?

According to Mary’s Nutritionals’ Chief Scientist, Jeremy Riggle, Ph.D., CBD has demonstrated the potential to help mitigate the symptoms of eczema, particularly pain, itch and inflammation. “All these responses are modulated by the endocannabinoid system, [which] plays a crucial role in skin pathogenesis and the maintenance of homeostasis,” he says. The endocannabinoid system helps regulate different processes including mood, memory, pain, appetite, stress, immune function and more. “CBD interacts with this system and may help the skin re-establish or maintain homeostasis, the result, in this case, being a reduction in symptoms associated with eczema.”

J ust like any relationship, the connection between CBD and eczema is complicated. Eczema, or atopic dermatitis, is an itchy skin condition that can creep up anywhere on the body but is usually found on the face, hands, wrists, back of the knees and/or the feet. Eczema affects millions with symptoms including “redness, irritation, dryness, flaking and itchy skin that has a rough appearance and touch,” explains California-based dermatologist Ava Shamban, M.D. “Eczema presents itself physically in a number of ways, [including] inflammation and cell proliferation.” Skin is our barrier from the outside world, and it keeps allergens, irritants, infection agents and other generally bad stuff out. Not only that but “it also wants to keep moisture in and avoid transepidermal water loss,” says Shamban. “When the barrier is not performing optimally is when we see the greatest intake of issues and the greatest loss of moisture, and the balance of the skin is part of the cause of the vicious cycle of eczema.” Atopic eczema is a chronic disease where the skin barrier has become leaky, and inflammation occurs.

Based on the recent studies, we know that the interaction of the skin with a CBD-based product can inhibit cell activation on the histamine response, which, when activated, leads to intense itching and inflammation. “However, purity of product and additives or other ingredients included in the product also matter and can have a reverse effect,” she says.