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hemp infused oil

Whether you take it outside or put it under your kitchen vent, not allowing the odor to fill your space is paramount when it comes to discretion. But accidents happen! If you find yourself in a situation where your space is too pungent, check out our article on how to get rid of the cannabis odor.

The trick for reducing odor is using the right tool for decarboxylation. The steam produced during cooking might not give off a pungent odor at first, but it gets stronger with time. It takes hours for the oil to finish, so you can imagine that the odor can build, and, if you are in the same room the whole time, you may not notice the gradual increase in dankness.

If you haven’t yet discovered the wonder that is cannabis-infused eating, I’m excited for you because you’re in for an adventure. The experience from start to finish is significantly different from common inhalation methods. The effects are typically longer, stronger, and slower to set in.

Materials needed:

Cannabis-infused oil is probably the most versatile medium and a great place to start, since it can be used for baking desserts, sautéing veggies, frying up your morning eggs, or putting in your salad dressing. In addition, as is the case with cooking anything at home, you have complete control over its preparation. Does peanut oil hold a special place in your heart? Make cannabis-infused peanut oil!

Picking the right oil for infusion comes down to your flavor preferences and the dishes you plan on cooking. Oils will have different consistencies at room temperature, so be sure to put thought into how you will be storing and using your oil.

If you are looking for an oil with a mild flavor, vegetable and canola oil are going to be great options. They are also very versatile and work with most recipes calling for oil.

Infusion is often the most challenging part of cooking with cannabis and the reason why many people turn to their vaporizer in defeat. I’m here to tell you that you can do this! Not only is it doable, but it’s worth it.

Set the immersion circulator to 200°F and place in a medium saucepan filled halfway with water. Grind the cannabis buds into small pieces and place in the vacuum-sealable bag with the distilled water. Using the vacuum sealer, seal the bag completely. When the circulator reaches 200°F, drop the sealed bag into the water and decarb for 30 minutes, rotating the bag every 5 to 10 minutes.

Each tablespoon of Cannabis-Infused Olive Oil contains about 29 mg THC, based on the use of a 20 percent THC strain. Plan accordingly to substitute for a portion, but not all, of the olive oil in a recipe.

Recipe Summary

Choose a strain of cannabis that complements or contrasts with your recipes. Like wine, the attributes are wide ranging, from sweet and earthy to citrusy and berry-like. Also consider the desired effect; certain strains are championed for their anti-inflammatory abilities while others are known for maintaining focus. A dispensary can steer you in the right direction.

In a small saucepan, combine oil and cannabis in a small saucepan and bring to a gentle simmer over medium heat; continue to cook for 20 minutes, stirring often. Remove saucepan from the heat and let steep for 30 minutes more.

Before cannabis can be used in a recipe, it must be activated or decarboxylated to maximize all of its benefits. Traditionally, decarbing meant heating the buds in a low oven for two to three hours, a process that can destroy flavor. Decarbing using sous vide, on the other hand, preserves the floral and fragrant flavors known as terpenes. After decarbing, you’ll gently infuse the cannabis in olive oil, creating an aromatic ingredient you’ll be able to use in both sweet and savory recipes, from aglio e olio pasta to chocolate pretzel cookies and a citrus-infused cake. You’ll need an immersion stick circulator, cannabis grinder, vacuum-sealable bag, and avacuum sealer for this recipe. Note: As cannabis regulation continues to evolve across the United States and around the world, please consult your local laws.