How Long Do Marijuana Seeds Last

ILGM

Buy Cannabis Seeds Online

cannabis seeds viability storage how long last methods containers temperature humidity expiry preservation Weed seeds can survive in the soil for years before they germinate and grow. First-time cannabis growers have a lot of things to learn at once, and one of them is proper seed storage. Many times you end up not using all of the seeds

How Long Do Cannabis Seeds Last?

Knowing how to properly store your cannabis seeds isn’t rocket science, but to a beginner grower especially, there’s a lot to be aware of. The key factors in maintaining seeds are storage methods, light, temperature, and humidity. If this looks like a minefield, don’t panic!

In this article, we’ll walk you through the main dos and don’ts of storage – not just the hows, but also the whys – and those precious seeds will be good to grow when you’re ready.

Understanding the Key Elements of Seeds Storage

To store marijuana seeds, it’s essential to starve them of the conditions they need to develop. Failure to do this can lead to a drop in germination rate, and you could easily find yourself opening a container of useless seeds which are no longer viable.

Consider all the variables involved in plant growth, and if needs be, carry out further research to better understand how these can impact seed storage. Since most plants see winter as the time of dormancy and spring as the time of new growth, the way you store your seeds should try to emulate the critical conditions of winter, which should keep the seeds from germinating.

Table of contents

Understanding Cannabis Seeds

Cannabis seeds are similar to any other type of seed used to produce plants. They’re hardy-looking things, but they have a shelf life. They’re also susceptible to environmental changes – too much fluctuation in any direction can cause them to spoil. An undesirable extreme change in temperature or humidity at the wrong time (during storage) will put paid to your seeds. Light is the other main naturally-occurring variable you should protect your marijuana seeds from.

It’s important to remember that your seeds are dormant before germination but very much alive. For this reason, it’s best to treat your cannabis seeds with a degree of care and common sense. Unless you’re about to germinate, make sure your seeds ‘sleep’ in ideal conditions.

How the Main Variables Affect your Cannabis Seeds

It’s one of the classic storage instructions on packages for all manner of products – store in a cool, dry, dark place. As mentioned above, high temperatures and moisture levels tend to cause things to spoil, especially if they contain natural ingredients.

Light, heat and moisture all signal to your seeds that it’s time to sprout, and each of these variables affects your seeds differently. Exposure to any of these elements will cause your seeds to expire unless they’re well protected.

Light

When you store cannabis seeds, it’s essential to keep them away from light. For example, don’t be tempted to throw a handful in a baggie and keep them in your grow room. Keep your seeds in their original packaging, or transfer them to an opaque, airtight container. Something such as an envelope or a blacked-out mason jar is perfect for room-temperature storage. Keeping seeds well-shielded will prevent them from absorbing any light before your planned germination time.

The shells – those hard, waxy coatings on seeds – offer a degree of protection against light. But while cannabis plants love light, cannabis seeds do not. In nature, cannabis seeds fall from the plant towards the end of the year when daylight levels are reduced. They then sit beneath a light covering of soil until the following spring when they could naturally germinate and bloom. It helps to think about the natural cycle when storing cannabis seeds. Keep them dormant until you decide you want them to germinate.

Humidity

If you want to store your cannabis seeds long-term and retain their viability, it’s imperative to keep humidity levels under control. Moist, humid conditions are key ingredients in the seed germination process. If you expose the seeds to high humidity levels too soon, they may begin to germinate on their own. You don’t want to store your seeds at too low a humidity either – that can bring a different set of problems entirely. Here’s how humidity levels can affect seed viability:

These figures are a rough guideline, as risks vary slightly depending on storage method and container type. Still, they serve as an excellent approximate rule of thumb for humidity levels. Excess moisture will soften the seed’s outer shell and cause the taproot to emerge. If you’re not actively germinating that seed, it’s spoiled.

Monitoring Humidity Levels for Cannabis Seeds

Keeping tabs on relative humidity levels is reasonably straightforward. You can pick up a humidity meter on Amazon.com, and while they can vary in terms of features and cost, there are budget humidity meters which are inexpensive and still do the job.

How to Control Humidity Levels for Cannabis Seeds

Start by choosing the storage container wisely and then the environment. Use an opaque tin, plastic container or the original packaging, so long as it’s a container that seals tightly. After that, it’s a question of choosing the right environment to ensure humidity is right for safe storage. Toss in a desiccant like a silica gel pack for extra help.

See also  Grease Monkey Cannabis Seeds

Storing Seeds Shorter-Term in a Room

If your planned storage spot is in a room that’s prone to condensation on the windows, pick another location. Condensation is a good indicator that room humidity is too high, and this will harm your seeds quickly. Choose wisely – laundry rooms or bathrooms naturally make bad spots to stash seeds due to high heat and humidity levels. A living room drawer or a dark cupboard in an area that doesn’t see too many extreme temperature fluctuations is ideal.

Opening windows and vents will help keep humidity levels nearer the sweet spot. If your storage space is prone to humidity, it may be worth investing in a dehumidifier. It’s impressive how much moisture these can pull out of the air after a few hours, so it’s good to know that some devices can decrease room humidity fast.

Storing Cannabis Seeds in the Refrigerator

This is a fairly common strategy for storing cannabis seeds. Seeds are placed in a suitable container and kept safely in the refrigerator for years, retaining great viability rates. The lower temperature of the fridge makes an ideal environment for preserving seeds, working in a similar way to storing food in your refrigerator. At low temperatures, the cellular biochemistry of the seed slows down, and the seed remains viable for years. This is why a cool place is always best for storing seeds.

Storing Cannabis Seeds in the Freezer

It’s certainly doable, but it’s arguably not necessary. Storing your cannabis seeds in the correct container in a freezer will undoubtedly extend the viability of those seeds. But is it a gamble worth taking? Sure, if you have many big projects planned and many seeds to store. In most cases, though, storing your seeds in a refrigerator is just as helpful and probably less risky. Some collectors store vintage seeds in a freezer for long-term safety, but this isn’t a necessity for most of us.

The Ideal Temperature Range for Safe Seed Storage

If storing your seeds in a cool, dry place, pop them in a drawer well away from heat sources. This quick and easy way to keep seeds stashed will ensure a good degree of viability in most cultivars. The main thing is to keep the temperature low and away from the risk of temperature changes. The lower the temperature, the longer you should effectively be able to store your seeds safely.

If storing cannabis seeds in the fridge, make sure your fridge can maintain a steady temperature of between 4°C and 6°C. This will ensure safe long-term storage. In both cases, it’s best to store seeds in a suitable container, especially if you’re storing them in a fridge. The lower temperature of the fridge demands a little more protection for your seeds. An opaque tin or container with a seal that is air and watertight is your best friend in this instance.

Cultivars

Not all seeds are created equal. If you’ve grown different cannabis strains from seed, you’ve probably noticed that some seeds are larger or more resilient than others. Some batches will occasionally contain failures, but most seeds should store long term without any hassle. Not every seed in a batch will necessarily respond the same way, though. In a bag of ten seeds, you might find a couple don’t germinate, and while this is annoying and unfortunate, it’s sometimes just the nature of the genetics.

Hypothetical Case Studies

Customer 1 is a hobbyist cannabis grower. He buys a couple of bags of seeds from Seedsman during a promotion, intending to plant some now and store others for later. Customer 1 can safely store his surplus seeds in the original package or transfer them to a suitable container. He can seal it and place it in a dark, dry cupboard or drawer, away from any heat source. Using this method for short-term storage, Customer 1’s cannabis seeds should easily remain viable for between three and five years.

Customer 2 is a commercial cannabis grower. She buys her cannabis seeds in bulk, but only ever has a dozen plants growing at any given time. In this situation, she can safely store her surplus seeds in an appropriate container inside a refrigerator. She sets her refrigerator to maintain a steady temperature between 4°C and 6°C. Using this storage method, Customer 2’s cannabis seeds should easily remain viable for five years or more.

Customer 3 is a well-known seed bank. They are looking to preserve certain genetics long into the future, and store those particular older seeds in a freezer. They ensure to keep seeds in the correct containers and handle them with care at every stage. Aware that the frozen tissue inside the seeds becomes delicate and at risk of shattering, they treat seeds with the utmost caution. These steps should see their seeds retain a high rate of viability for decades.

Having Quality Genetics Helps

The answer to the question, then, is seed viability is largely dependent on how you store your seeds. By knowing how long you want to keep your seeds, and storing them accordingly, you can take the proper steps to ensure they will remain viable for as long as you need them to. Remember that seeds contain living matter, and there’s always a percentage risk of failure. This is true regardless of how well you handle and store them. By buying cannabis seeds from a top-quality seed bank like Seedsman, you ensure greater quality of genetics and stack the odds of a high germination rate in your favour.

See also  Can You Smoke Marijuana Seeds

Cultivation information, and media is given for those of our clients who live in countries where cannabis cultivation is decriminalised or legal, or to those that operate within a licensed model. We encourage all readers to be aware of their local laws and to ensure they do not break them.

How long do weed seeds survive in the soil?

CORVALLIS – Weed seeds can survive in the soil for years before they germinate and grow, according to Jed Colquhoun, weed specialist with the Oregon State University Extension Service.

Why should home gardeners care?

“If you combine the longevity of seeds in the soil with the fact that weeds such as common lambsquarters can produce over 500,000 seeds per plant, the incentive to hand weed your garden becomes much greater,” said Colquhoun.

“Prevention is the most effective form of weed control,” he said.

Here are some basics on weed seed biology:

Undisturbed weed seeds tend to persist longer than seeds subjected to periodic tillage. Weed seeds in deeply worked soil tend to last longer than seeds in shallowly worked soil. Seeds deep in the soil are “stored” below the germination zone.

Grass seeds tend to be less persistent than broadleaf weed seeds.

The number of surviving seeds of most weed species declines rapidly the first year. But thereafter the rate of weed seed decline slows. Some seeds can persist for decades.

As many as 130 million seeds per plow acre were found in a Minnesota study.

Different species of weeds have seeds that last varying numbers of years in the soil. The scientific literature provides some information about seed longevity, including:

  • Brome grass seed seldom lasts more than two years.
  • Annual ryegrass – up to nine years.
  • Perennial ryegrass – up to three years.
  • Annual bluegrass – up to about five years.
  • Wild oats – three to six years, but longer in deep soil.
  • Jointed goatgrass – three to five-and-a-half years.
  • Barnyardgrass – up to 13 years.
  • Quackgrass – up to four years.
  • Common velvetgrass – 10 years or more.
  • Mustards – are long lived. Seeds excavated from a monastery in Denmark were dated to be 600 years old and 11 of them germinated. More commonly, mustard seeds last for decades.
  • Lambsquarters – may last up to four decades.
  • Russian thistle (tumbleweed) – short lived, most live only a year.
  • Wild carrot – several years.
  • Curly dock – more than a decade.
  • Canada thistle – more than two decades.
  • Field bindweed – more than 50 years.
  • Leafy spurge – at least a few years.
  • Common groundsel – most die within a year.

Scientists found lotus seeds in Manchuria that germinated after over 1,000 years, said Colquhoun.

How Long Do Marijuana Seeds Last?

First-time cannabis growers have a lot of things to learn at once, and one of them is proper seed storage. Many times you end up not using all of the seeds that you purchased, or you decided to keep some of the seeds your own cannabis plants have produced because you want to keep the genetics going, so you want to store them safely.

So, can cannabis seeds be stored without losing their viability to germinate? How long do marijuana seeds last if stored properly? We’ll cover these questions in today’s article as well as give you some tips on how to store your seeds the right way, so let’s get started.

Do Cannabis Seeds Ever Go Bad?

Cannabis seeds are much like any other plant seed – they have a waxy outer shell that protects the embryonic material on the inside, and as long as there is no damage to the shell, the seed will remain viable for germination.

However, if stored for too long without germinating or if it’s improperly stored, the weed seed can dry out to the point where it cracks, which exposes the genetic material inside, making it unfit for germination.

Another scenario would be for the outer shell to dry out and harden to the point where moisture or air won’t be able to get in, in which case the embryonic material won’t be able to survive.

The Three Main Factors That Influence the Shelf Life of Cannabis Seeds

The shelf life of cannabis seeds can be influenced by the genetics of the cannabis strain, but this is only minor compared to how they’re stored. Quality seeds may be more resilient, but if not stored properly, their lifespan will be impacted.

To preserve your weed seeds, the goal is to keep them from germinating prematurely, and to do that, you should pay close attention to the three factors that greatly influence their shelf life.

Light

Light is one of the propagators of germination because it signals them that it’s time to wake up and sprout. If your seeds are exposed to light, crucial chemical changes will happen within the seed, and even if it doesn’t germinate now, these changes will prevent it from germinating later because the natural process will be disrupted.

Temperature

Warm temperatures also signal that it’s time for germination. And not only that, but warm temperatures can increase the moisture, and excess moisture creates a breeding ground for mold and rot. Therefore, keeping the seeds at a temperature between 42°F and 46°F is recommended.

See also  Gelato Weed Seed
Humidity

Humidity is the third factor that influences the shelf life of weed seeds and it’s also closely related to temperature. The relative humidity is a crucial element in seed germination, but when storing seeds, you want to keep it at a minimum. Relative humidity between 20% to 30% would be best – you still want some moisture so that the seeds don’t dry out completely.

How Long Do Marijuana Seeds Last?

Most seed banks would recommend that you plant the seeds within a year, but the truth is, when stored correctly, cannabis seeds can remain viable for up to five years. In rare cases, some growers have managed to keep them for seven to ten years, but this is definitely not common. You should know that the longer they are stored, the longer it will take to germinate as they will gradually lose their viability. Old seeds definitely take longer to sprout than new ones, but they do sprout nonetheless.

How to Tell That Your Weed Seeds Are Still Viable

There are some signs you can look for to check if your weed seeds are still viable for germination.

  • If the seeds have a dark color, like dark brown or grey, or even black, it means that the outer shell is intact and that they’re still good to use;
  • The seeds should have a waxy coating that looks shiny because it means that it’s still able to retain moisture;
  • If you can lightly and carefully squeeze the seed without it cracking immediately, it’s probably still viable;
  • Healthy weed seeds don’t have any cracks or holes, so if the outer shell isn’t damaged, the seed is okay.

How to Properly Store Cannabis Seeds to Prolong Their Shelf Life

The key to storing cannabis seeds is to keep them in a stable environment without changes. Frequent changes stress the seeds and cause them to use up their nutrient reserve, which inevitably makes them useless in the end.

Store Them In a Tightly Sealed Container

Cannabis seeds need some degree of oxygen in their environment, but too much of it can also invite bacteria and parasites, and not to mention, it could dry out the seeds. Therefore, keeping them in an airtight container is the safest way to make sure they remain intact.

Keep Them Somewhere With a Low Room Temperature

As we previously said, warm temperatures will incite germination, so storing your seeds in a cool place is ideal. This could be the basement, the pantry, or a storage room – anything works as long as the place has a constant low room temperature. Pay close attention to this, especially if you live somewhere warm.

Watch the Humidity Levels

High humidity poses a danger to cannabis seeds, not only because it makes them sprout when they shouldn’t, but it can also invite mold. Therefore, storing them in a relatively dry place would be great. If you’re unable to store them somewhere dry, you can place cotton balls in the container to soak up excess moisture or even use a food-grade desiccant, like silica gel packs, or even Boveda packs, as they’re specifically designed for these purposes.

Put Them In a Dark Place

Finally, weed seeds need to be protected from light for obvious reasons. Even if you use an opaque container (which is recommended), you should still store them in a dark place. You can also use a mason jar or any kind of clear glass container, but you’ll have to make sure it’s hidden from the light.

Plastic containers and plastic bags are not recommended because they encourage excess moisture and they let air in. Use them only for short-term storage if you absolutely have to.

For Long-Term Storage, You Can Freeze the Marijuana Seeds

Cannabis seeds can stay good for a few years if you meet the conditions, but you can also freeze them for long-term storage. If you end up freezing them, it’s best that you store them in a vacuum seal and remember to keep them frozen until you decide to use them. Thawed and refrozen seeds will lose their viability, so you should avoid this.

The Takeaway – Store Them In a Dark, Cool, and Dry Place for Up to Five Years

Even though seed banks recommend that you plant weed seeds within a year after buying them, they can have a shelf life of up to five years when stored properly. If, that is, you store them in a stable environment without temperature changes, high humidity, and light. Or in other words, a cool, dark, and dry place. Storing them in an opaque airtight container is ideal, but you can also freeze them if you want to. Old seeds take longer to germinate, but as long as their shell is not damaged and they still look healthy, they should be good to use.

Disclaimer

The information presented on this page is provided as a public service to aid in education and is derived from sources believed to be reliable. Readers are responsible for making their own assessment of the topics discussed here. In no event shall Leaf Nation be held reliable for any injury, loss or damage that could happen if using or abusing drugs.

How useful was this post?

Click on a star to rate it!

Average rating 4 / 5. Vote count: 1

No votes so far! Be the first to rate this post.