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is cbd oil legal in new mexico

The recreational use of marijuana is illegal in the state. However, under the 2007 Lynn and Erin Compassionate Use Act, medical use of marijuana is allowed in New Mexico. However, you must meet some requirements to get a medical card here.

Given the rapid growth of the hemp industry in the U.S., it’s now easier than ever to buy CBD oil locally, and New Mexico is no exception. In fact, the state is home to an abundance of CBD stores and vape shops located in many cities in New Mexico.

Keeping these three simple tips in mind, shopping for hemp-derived CBD oil online should be a lot easier.

MARIJUANA CBD OIL IN NEW MEXICO

Below, you’ll find everything there is to know about the legality of both marijuana and hemp-based CBD oil. Read on if you don’t want to get in trouble when shopping for cannabidiol in New Mexico!

As mentioned before, the legality of cannabidiol depends on its source. There are two types of cannabis plants: hemp and marijuana. The first one comes with up to 0.3% of THC in general, while marijuana contains more of this psychoactive compound.

Royal CBD – Full Spectrum

But what are the exact rules when it comes to hemp and marijuana here? Here is everything you need to know about the legality of CBD in New Mexico.

The 2018 Farm Bill officially removed hemp from the list of Controlled Substances, although marijuana is still illegal in states without adult-use legislation in place. Therefore, CBD derived from marijuana plants is still illegal, while CBD derived from hemp is legal as long as it contains less than 0.3% THC.

While the Farm Bill did legalize hemp, the production and the sale of any product derived from it, including CBD, it is still highly regulated. The bill also allows some states to make their own rules for CBD cultivation and sale. States may also try to regulate CBD in food, beverages, dietary supplements, and other products instead of waiting for final FDA rules.

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The 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act categorized all types of cannabis, including hemp, as Schedule 1, defined as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction. The act prevented further research that may have shed light on beneficial uses for cannabis.

This broad classification was first changed following the passage of the 2014 Farm Bill, which recognized the difference between hemp, which contains less than 0.3% THC by weight, and marijuana, which contains more than 0.3% THC by weight and is still considered to be a Schedule 1 substance.

After the passage of the US 2014 Farm Bill, New Mexico was one of many states that moved to legalize industrial hemp production, but the bill was vetoed by Republican Gov. Susana Martinez. After that veto was overturned by the New Mexico Supreme Court in 2017, the Legislature moved forward and eventually prevailed, placing the legal standard for hemp at 0.3% or less THC by weight, following suit with the limit set by the federal government. The bill acknowledges the right of federally recognized Native American tribes to set up their own regulations for hemp.