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o thc cbd oil

Overall, THC-free CBD oil is safe with few, if any, adverse effects. However, some people may experience mild side effects, but this can typically be reduced by lowering the dosage as needed. 

According to the World Health Organization, THC-free CBD oil has no effects that indicate it may have abuse or dependence potential. Not to mention, there have been no findings of any health-related problems linked with pure CBD use. This means that you can gain the mental and physical benefits of the cannabis plant through CBD oil without the potential concerns associated with marijuana use.

If you've been considering adding CBD to your wellness routine but are concerned about possible side effects, THC-free CBD oil is a great place to start. THC, or tetrahydrocannabinol, is the part of the cannabis plant that's responsible for psychoactive effect (in other words, the feeling of being 'high'). While some types of CBD, or cannabidiol oil, contain very trace amounts of THC, an oil that's completely THC-free ensures you're not ingesting even the tiniest bit of the ingredient. This way, you can enjoy the benefits of CBD without worrying about any psychoactive effects that may impede your work or home activities.

What to look for in THC-free CBD oil

Broad-spectrum CBD and CBD isolate are two THC-free types you may consider. Broad-spectrum contains some of the other beneficial cannabis plant compounds found in full-spectrum CBD, but it is still THC-free. On the other hand, CBD isolate is the purest form of CBD, and therefore contains no other cannabis compounds.

Before we get into the details of these recommendations, let's go over the basics of THC-free options.

Keep in mind  that you don't always have to ingest CBD by dropping it under your tongue. You could also add your CBD drops to your food and drink to make it more palatable, or if you have localized pain or soreness, you may want to try a topical CBD product.

When choosing a THC-free CBD oil product, it's important to consider factors such as the type of hemp extract used (specifically, broad-spectrum versus CBD isolate), as well as where the hemp was grown (those grown overseas are not as tightly regulated as in the U.S.). States such as Colorado have especially strong hemp programs that spot-test hemp plants in the field to check THC levels and will investigate the use of any illegal pesticides.

Cannabis contains over 113 different chemical compounds known as cannabinoids. Cannabidiol (CBD) and delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) are two types of chemical compounds derived from cannabis. In recent years, interest has grown in the potential health effects and benefits of cannabis. Much of this interest has centered on these two cannabinoids.

While THC and CBD share similarities, there are some key differences between the two compounds.

What Is CBD?

When choosing products containing CBD or THC, it is also important to consider their legality. Both marijuana and THC are included in the U.S. Controlled Substances Act, which means that they are not legal under federal law. As of July 2020, 33 states and Washington, D.C. have enacted policies allowing medical marijuana and products containing THC to be prescribed by a doctor. Some states also allow recreational use of marijuana and THC-containing products.

CBD and THC affect different receptors in the brain. Because of this, CBD typically does not have psychoactive effects—in other words, it won’t cause you to get high.

While research on the potential health benefits of THC, CBD, and other cannabinoids is still in the early stages, there is evidence that these substances may be helpful for conditions including: