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things marijuana cures

Without further ado, here is our complete list:

Before we jump to the list of conditions, we must remind you that medical marijuana is not legal in every state and every state has its own list of qualifying conditions to receive medical marijuana. Furthermore, medical marijuana is not monitored, therefore when using it, you may not know its purity, potency or side effects. It’s important to consume responsibly and according to the law.

Scientists are constantly researching these conditions, and while some are showing that marijuana is having a definite positive effect on these conditions, others are still at early stages of research.

How to Recieve Medical Marijuana?

While medical marijuana is still classed as a Schedule 1 Drug, there is no set of rules that dictate the exact healthcare conditions to which a patient is eligible to be treated with marijuana. Each state has its own list of qualifyfing conditions and they might not match this list. Should you need medical marijuana assistance feel free to reach out to understand the LEGAL process of obtaining MMJ in your state.

It’s important to understand that apart from the common medical conditions that are constantly talked about in different articles, such as pain, there is a wide range of other medical conditions that could benefit from medical marijuana.

In this guide, we’ve gathered as many different conditions as we could find. We’ve consulted with various marijuana physicians and done quite a bit of research to bring you the ultimate list of conditions that medical marijuana can cure.

Aware of any other conditions it can assist with, share your knowledge with us on our Facebook Post or in the comments below.

To take medical marijuana, you can:

While every state has laws dictating the use of medical marijuana, more than two thirds of U.S. states and the District of Columbia have actually legalized it for medical treatments and more are considering bills to do the same. Yet while many people are using marijuana, the FDA has only approved it for treatment of two rare and severe forms of epilepsy, Dravet syndrome and Lennox-Gastaut syndrome.

Has the FDA approved medical marijuana?

Limited research suggests cannabinoids might:

The drug can also affect judgment and coordination, which could lead to accidents and injuries. When used during the teenage years when the brain is still developing, marijuana might affect IQ and mental function.

But it’s not yet proven to help many of these conditions, with a few exceptions, Bonn-Miller says.

The most common use for medical marijuana in the United States is for pain control. While marijuana isn’t strong enough for severe pain (for example, post-surgical pain or a broken bone), it is quite effective for the chronic pain that plagues millions of Americans, especially as they age. Part of its allure is that it is clearly safer than opiates (it is impossible to overdose on and far less addictive) and it can take the place of NSAIDs such as Advil or Aleve, if people can’t take them due to problems with their kidneys or ulcers or GERD.

There are few subjects that can stir up stronger emotions among doctors, scientists, researchers, policy makers, and the public than medical marijuana. Is it safe? Should it be legal? Decriminalized? Has its effectiveness been proven? What conditions is it useful for? Is it addictive? How do we keep it out of the hands of teenagers? Is it really the “wonder drug” that people claim it is? Is medical marijuana just a ploy to legalize marijuana in general?

Marijuana without the high

Patients do, however, report many benefits of CBD, from relieving insomnia, anxiety, spasticity, and pain to treating potentially life-threatening conditions such as epilepsy. One particular form of childhood epilepsy called Dravet syndrome is almost impossible to control but responds dramatically to a CBD-dominant strain of marijuana called Charlotte’s Web. The videos of this are dramatic.

Along these lines, marijuana is said to be a fantastic muscle relaxant, and people swear by its ability to lessen tremors in Parkinson’s disease. I have also heard of its use quite successfully for fibromyalgia, endometriosis, interstitial cystitis, and most other conditions where the final common pathway is chronic pain.

Least controversial is the extract from the hemp plant known as CBD (which stands for cannabidiol) because this component of marijuana has little, if any, intoxicating properties. Marijuana itself has more than 100 active components. THC (which stands for tetrahydrocannabinol) is the chemical that causes the “high” that goes along with marijuana consumption. CBD-dominant strains have little or no THC, so patients report very little if any alteration in consciousness.