Posted on

where to buy cbd oil in new hampshire

If you’re interested in finding the best place to get CBD oil in New Hampshire, the state offers plenty of opportunities for buying top-notch hemp products. In this article, you’ll learn everything about the legal status of both hemp and marijuana in New Hampshire.

Since hemp-derived CBD oil is fully legal all over the U.S., you can find it in many stores across New Hampshire.

Where to Buy CBD Oil in New Hampshire?

Want to get access to an abundance of hemp-based products and the most recommended manufacturers? All you need to do is open your browser and start your online CBD shopping journey.

Then, we’ll introduce you to the list of the top-rated in-state CBD retailers. Here we go!

Cannabidiol is becoming extremely popular in the U.S. because of its wide range of health and wellness benefits. In fact, CBD oil is probably one of the most wanted wellness products these days. Thus, we can expect more CBD stores popping up in the states, and New Hampshire is clearly no exception.

Cannabis laws in New Hampshire are somewhat rudimentary. Recreational cannabis is illegal, and the state has a legal medical marijuana program. But beyond that, New Hampshire lawmakers have opted to defer to federal policy when it comes to CBD products.

Full-spectrum means that the CBD has been extracted from a hemp plant along with all other chemicals in the plant, including terpenes and whatever trace amounts of THC the plant may have produced. Consuming full-spectrum CBD may yield better results thanks to the entourage effect, a phenomenon in which the entire mixture of cannabinoids and terpenes work together and complement one another inside the body.

Image lightbox

The Hemp Farming Act of 2018 legalized hemp cultivation and created a pathway to remove industrial hemp from Schedule I status by creating a legal divide: Hemp is cannabis that contains less than .3% THC by weight, and marijuana is cannabis that contains more than .3% THC. Hemp-derived CBD was thus descheduled from the Controlled Substances Act by the bill, but CBD that is derived from the marijuana plant is still considered federally illegal because marijuana is still categorized as a Schedule I substance. While hemp is now considered an agricultural commodity, it still must be produced and sold under regulations that implement the bill.

Even though hemp plants typically don’t produce enough of the cannabinoid THC to cause intoxication, all types of cannabis, including hemp, were considered illegal under the 1970 Federal Controlled Substances Act. The legislation swept all cannabis into the Schedule I category, which defined cannabis as a substance with a high potential for abuse, no accepted medical use, and a likelihood for addiction.

CBD is not allowed as a food additive in New Hampshire. Photo by: Gina Coleman/Weedmaps